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Joseph J. Bozell

Professor of Biomass Chemistry, UT

Biography

Much of the success of modern industrialized society results directly from easy access to large, concentrated supplies of nonrenewable carbon in the form of coal, crude oil, or natural gas. But the decreasing supply and environmental disadvantages of these raw materials is driving the rapidly growing field of bioenergy development, and the use of renewable carbon sources to supply biobased chemicals and fuels.

Dr. Joseph J. Bozell’s group at the University of Tennessee is addressing these opportunities by using the tools of organic chemistry and synthesis for biomass conversion. As the leader of this research effort, Professor Bozell brings over 20 years of experience in the conversion of renewable materials into chemicals, synthetic methodology development, and transition metal catalysis.

Prof. Bozell received his B. S. degree in chemistry from South Dakota State University, and a Ph. D. from Colorado State University in organic synthesis and organometallic chemistry under Professor Louis S. Hegedus. His professional career began with a postdoctoral fellowship at Princeton University, continuing his work in organometallic chemistry and synthesis with Professor Martin F. Semmelhack.

He joined the Corporate Research staff of Monsanto in St. Louis in 1982, and moved to the staff of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, CO in 1989, where he rose to the rank of Principal Scientist in their National Bioenergy Center. In 2006, Dr. Bozell joined UT, where he is now Professor of Biomass Chemistry in UT’s Center for Renewable Carbon.

Dr. Bozell is a co-recipient of the 1999 Environmental Protection Agency’s Presidential Green Chemistry Award and the 2008 Henry Lardy Distinguished Lecturer Award. Research in Dr. Bozell’s programs link the clear need for understanding the fundamentals of biomass transformation with its real world applications, and will offer Bredesen Center students opportunities to study catalysis for the transformation biorefinery process streams, selective oxidation of carbohydrates and lignin, biochemical conversion of lignin to liquid fuels, carbohydrate based bolaforms as self-assembling nanostructures or the use of biomass carbohydrates as sources of new polymeric materials.


Education

B. S. degree in chemistry from South Dakota State University

Ph. D. from Colorado State University in organic synthesis and organometallic chemistry


Awards and Recognitions

1999 Environmental Protection Agency’s Presidential Green Chemistry Award

2008 Henry Lardy Distinguished Lecturer Award


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